Science on PRP

(Platelet-rich Plasma)

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a concentrate of platelet-rich plasma protein derived from whole bloodcentrifuged to remove red blood cells. It has a greater concentration of growth factors than whole blood, and has been used to encourage a brisk healing response across several specialties, in particular dentistryorthopedics and dermatology.

As a concentrated source of blood plasma and autologous conditioned plasma, PRP contains several different growth factors and other cytokines that can stimulate healing of soft tissue and joints. Main indication in sports medicine and orthopedics are acute muscle strainstendinopathy and muscle-fascial injuries and osteoarthritis. Main indications in dermatology for PRP are androgenic alopeciawound healing, and skin rejuvenation. For preparation of PRP, various protocols are used, with an underlying principle of concentrating platelets to 3–5 times physiological levels, then injecting this concentrate in the tissue where healing is desired.

 

PRP FOR RUNNERS/ATHLETES

The use of platelet rich plasma (PRP), a portion of the patient's own blood having a platelet concentration above baseline, to promote healing of injured tendons, ligaments, muscles, and joints, can be applied to various musculoskeletal problems.

  • PRP can be carefully injected into the injured area. For example, in Achilles tendonitis, a condition commonly seen in runners and tennis players, the heel cord can become swollen, inflamed, and painful. A mixture of PRP and local anesthetic can be injected directly into this inflamed tissue. Afterwards, the pain at the area of injection may actually increase for the first week or two, and it may be several weeks before the patient feels a beneficial effect.

  • PRP may also be used to improve healing after surgery for some injuries. For example, an athlete with a completely torn heel cord may require surgery to repair the tendon. Healing of the torn tendon can possibly be improved by treating the injured area with PRP during surgery. This is done by preparing the PRP in a special way that allows it to actually be stitched into torn tissues.

 

PRP FOR DRY EYES

LASIK, although highly successful has a common side effect, ocular surface syndrome. It is typically characterised by dry eyes. Studies with platelet-rich plasma has shown to be effective in treating ocular surface syndrome. 

Eye-PRP or PRP Serum For Dry Eyes or Autologous SerumEye Drops (ASEDs) is obtained by mixing Platelet-Rich Plasma with Saline solution. This is combination of PRP and saline solution has almost the same salinity and PH as that of the actual tears so there's no issue of stinging or burning.

 

PRP FOR WOMEN'S HEALTH

New Scientist explores the latest research for Menopause reversal and fertility management with the aid of Platelet-rich Plasma (PRP).

 Read more about this fascinating discovery  https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23130833-100-menopause-reversal-restores-periods-and-produces-fertile-eggs/

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THE 'O' SHOT

The O-Shot, or “orgasm shot,” is a non-surgical procedure that claims to treat sexual dysfunction and stimulate the vagina in a way that positively impacts orgasm. The procedure uses the patients’ drawn blood to stimulate vaginal and clitoral rejuvenation. Platelets extracted from the blood, or platelet-rich plasma (PRP), are then placed in a syringe and injected into an area near the clitoris and an area just inside the vagina — the “o-spot.” Those platelets then stimulate the growth of new cells in the injected areas, making those areas more sensitive to the touch. The O-Shot improves orgasm, libido, and arousal. A 2011 study found that about 80 percent of women fake orgasms during vaginal intercourse. Female sexual dysfunction (FSD), which encompasses the inability to orgasm, is very common.

Read more about this:

 

PRP FOR HAIR LOSS

PRP therapy is used in hair restoration for natural looking results

Androgenic alopecia or male pattern baldness is a very common type of hair loss observed in both males and females. With a thin needle, your own Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) is injected into the scalp. Then the growth factors in your blood cells do their job and hair growth is naturally stimulated. It is hypothesised that growth factors released from platelets may act on stem cells in the bulge area of the follicles, stimulating the development of new follicles and promoting neovascularisation.

PRP Hair Restoration is suitable for both men and women. It is a state of the art, non surgical, totally natural, alternative medical procedure used for the treatment of hair loss or hair thinning. It is an injectable treatment which uses the patient’s own blood. 

The blood plasma (PRP) contains active growth factors which can promote hair growth. Helping to restore one’s confidence, the end result is a fuller, healthier looking head of hair.

Read more about PRP for Hairloss

The May 2017 Edition of Popular Mechanics featured PRP Treatment as a promising treatment for hairloss. 

Journals of Medical Research

Medical Articles

Evaluation of the benefit of using a combination of autologous platelet rich-plasma and hyaluronic acid for the treatment of Peyronie’s disease

 Ronald Virag

 

Centre d’Exploration et Traitement de l’Impuissance (CETI) Paris, France

 Hélène Sussman

 

Centre d’Exploration et Traitement de l’Impuissance (CETI) Paris, France

 Sandrine Lambion

 

SLC Besançon, France

 Valérie de Fourmestraux

Sex Health Issues, 2017

 
 

PRP TREATMENT FOR HORSES

PRP (Platelet-rich Plasma) has been used in horses to treat ligament and tendon injuries, eye ulcers, and skin wounds. It is particularly beneficial in treating injuries in areas of limited vascularization or blood flow. These growth factors have been shown to stimulate tendon and ligament healing. The enhanced healing response on a cellular and molecular level may ultimately improve the quality of repair, improve the prognosis for return to performance, and decrease the incidence of re-injury. 

 

PRP can be used for the treatment of joints, bursae and soft tissue injuries. For joints, the procedure is the same as that for injecting any other product such as local anaesthetic or corticosteroids – the joint is usually clipped and then cleaned to reduce the risk of infection before the PRP is injected. For soft tissue injuries such as tendon or ligament strains, a number of injection sites may be needed and the PRP is often injected through small needles placed through the skin into the site of injury.